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of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
of this great tabloid from england and you will see this is his common-law wife a and then "mississippi burning" because wait until you hear how scarpa senior saul's the "mississippi burning" case. scarpa sr. had various nicknames, the killing machine, he thought he had a license to kill and he would sign the notes killing machine they called him career reaper, the mad hatter, hannibal lector because he was stopped counting after 50 birder's that makes him the most prolific killer pardon to stop counting and makes the wood of the top serial killers of all time he only did 30 years -- 30 days out of 30 years in prison he was a topic for mint his memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. three separate crime organized strike force in chicago, a brooklyn tried to put him away in the justice department tried to get this mad killer of history and other members of the fbi who are protecting him to keep them on the street. these are couple of homicides in the upper left corner he shot him while he was stringing christmas tree lights with his wife at his house. nicky was sitting in his toyota whe
. and then mississippi burning. wait until you hear hal scarpa senior is the gatt this of the mississippi burning portrayed in that movie which they happen. scarpa see at various nicknames. they call them the killing machine. he reveled in this. he felt that he had a license to kill. he would sign notes cayenne, killing machine. they called him the grim reaper, hannibal lector, the mad hatter. he had various names. he stopped counting after 50 murders, which makes him the most prolific killer in the history of cosa nostra, bar none and it makes him one of the top zero colors of all time, by the way. anyway, he only did 30 days in 30 years in prison. why? because from 1962 forward he was the top echelon criminal informants for the fbi. his briefing memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. over the years three separate organized crime strike forces, one in newark, one in chicago, one in brooklyn tried to put them away. could people are trying to get this mad dog killer of the street. other members of the fbi you are protecting him and keeping it on the street. these are a couple of the homic
in mississippi. there was a fear that somebody would get the idea the connecticut of the players. because in some ways these players were civil rights workers. in so most of the players, including the rights players, did not deal very much with the community at large. there really didn't. there were there to play ball. there were not big thinkers. maybe one of them once. >> did you happen to see the jackie robinson from an 42? >> i like to the lot, and i would probably be the most cynical of all. >> i was curious about it because he said the manager brought these guys and because it was a financial decision, a business decision. that was the same theme from 42. analysts is curious about the. seventeen years had passed. was is still a financial thing really or was it just -- >> row, what he said it was -- he had been dead for 20 years, so i did not get to interview him. he did not need the money personally. he was more of the richest as in town. he made in the timber industry. i don't think personally it would be doing something that was right. he loved baseball. a but being a baseball player at t
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
the speech but the flow of blood -- couldn't make the march. because she was in jail in mississippi when the sheriff told the -- they beat her unconscious. she couldn't make the march. james couldn't make the march. he was in jail. the day of the march the people were in jail. and so i'm anxious for us to make a appropriation legislation event not just reflection and motivation. i'm already motivated. we are -- that's why you came here now. let me say reverend jackson. here is what reverend jacksons wants you to do. we need some money. we are having a reception next door. we knew we put together. we didn't get no sponsor. we need some support. i hope in all of our givings let us sustain ourselves. something we should ask people -- [inaudible] sometimes we can't fight if the people got the fight on the right -- [inaudible] am i right about that? >> yes. >> you wouldn't like to give $100 would you stand. we need the money real bad. >> you would give at least $100. stand. this is not personal. pay your way. >> pay your way. >> credit card, food stamps. stand up. stand up. keep standing. now
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
kinds of other stuff happening in the summer. the great mississippi flood. the biggest natural disaster in american history. and you had al capone beginning -- the beginning of the end of al capone, and the end of prohibition. the information that it was coming to an end. you had the -- building mt. rushmoore, and coolidge announced he did not run for re-election. for reasons that are still slightly mystifying. henry ford had a madid -- a madid to build a city. so this book came not just looking at these two figures, baby ruth and lindbergh but looking at everything that was happening. it was kind of frenetic amount of activity, a great deal hoff changed the world, changed the way we perceived popular entertainment and so on. so it was constance general shall and always interesting and lively. >> host: any reason all these events happened in the summer of 1927? >> guest: they just happened in the summer of 1927. that is what kind of interesting about it. sometimes these things just happen and all of these happened then. by and large there wasn't any particular reason. they weren't there
, several other states said we made a big mistake. and mississippi had already done a better job than many and has now mandated its civil rights to be taught in all of the high schools in mississippi to read a great step forward for the state of mississippi which had -- north carolina has become the new mississippi now. so mississippi lost its place. i will let someone else answer the question. that is one of my students. a bright young man. >> i would just say it is the story itself at morehouse college for sure. we are going on line with some things and converging the expertise and the brain power. we have one of our professor. a couple things have happened in the country recently. the monument here in washington was about $120 million. and then the civil rights museum in atlanta. here is morehouse college that built a chapel in 1979 with a statute out front. we say that we need to convert more resources to really undergird this tradition at morehouse and that is what we are going to do. >> my name is jane and i had the honor of working at the brookings institution previously give it my
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
twain. would come from? before he came to nevada territory he worked on the mississippi, and he became a steamboat captain. and the term mark twain is two fathoms, deep. it was from the water, the draft of a steamboat and they would say, mark twain. welcome he liked that apparently came you. this is the story that is generally accepted. there's another story about him having a tab at the bar and if you ask me, mark twain, mark two, put that on my tab. i think the generally accepted point of view from scholars is mark twain from being a steamboat captain. so here he is, writing for the enterprise, first time he put mark twain. it's published february 3. from then on, he is mark twain. and is stock would grow as his stores would be picked a. a newspaper in aurora woodpecker that the a newspaper in sacramento would pick it up to newspaper in san francisco. mostly in the western united states through the use of the telegraph. and very funny, although he says some things that they don't know if it's the truth or not. are the hoaxes? he has one story about a family, not far from carson city
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
to the united states in 1848. he found that living on the mississippi was not quite the life that mark twain for trade in his book. together the dangberg brothers went to work together in a flour mill and then they moved to illinois where they were, from for threeyein 1853 hearing on tt stories about the gold rush and california, they decided to make the move west. they did this by buying 200 head of livestock and driving them from st. louis to california. it turns out that could be a very profitable venture. because even back then things are more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or an ox for five or $10 in st. louis. same animal would cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada, in 1853, they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years, operating with mixed results. some days were exhausting, some is not so much. he did that for three winters. one of the letters that we recovered, he said that he gave up gold-mining because there w
antecedence in the first black boy who was assassinated in mississippi in 1955 for allegedly violating racial adequate and speaking to a white woman. her body was placed in the tallahassee river with the 25 -- nugent. it was shown in jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our democracy. when you think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from a birmingham jail and in that letter dr. king said the activism going on in birmingham and the young women and men being arrested sometimes as young as 8, 9, 10 years old are taking this nation back to those great wells of democracy dug deep by the founding fathers. king was being kind because the country was founded on racial slavery. a conversation that we still have not had but 50 years ago with the march on washington provided, a litmus test for american democracy. when canes speaks at the march on washington on august 28, 1963, he says americans of all colors and all races are going to have to struggle together, go to jail together to try to fundamental
shelton was up for it. this was a guy who was born in mississippi. he grew up on a farm in a cotton. he had a lot of different jobs through his life. he was tough as nails and he joined the military when he was 18 years old. he joined as a private and went to korea and saw action right away. he was wounded three times, won the silver star. he came back and decided i love the military. i'm going to make this my career. the only time he left the military was back just before you got married. he decided he was going to try farming again. the military had a policy that you can leave the military for 90 days and returned -- if you return within 90 days you would get your previous rank but after 90 days you have to go back to being a private and at the time he was a sergeant. on the 87th day he returned because farming in mississippi was just too hard and love to the army life and he missed it. so, he decided since he was going to make it a career he was going to do more than learn as much as he possibly could. so at 28 years old to cut off age for becoming an officer, he applied for officer
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
: next call comes from stark phill mississippi. >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: in 97i was in middle school in mississippi and from the gif corporation dr. carson came to talk to the students at the school and i wanted to know was he making a national tour to visit the different schools because we also had to read his books and write reports. i want to know was he planning on making vose? >> host: what did you think of dr. carson's visit when you were in middle school? >> caller: this is the reason i'm calling. one of the things that stuck out to me in his book is he said he had an ander management problem. and so in my town, that's one of the things with the young people that is on the rise, a lot of armed robberies and rising murders and so he decided he found a way to channel that energy into a directed effort and so i wanted to know -- that's what got me in this book. but it was in '97, '98. i wanted to know can he bring that energy fishback? >> host: can you tell let him personally as well? >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i've been actually traveling around the country givi
them. some of them had to be cut on the bottom by hand. such is life on the mississippi, on -- what is the date on that? i can't read it. 1875. this book isn't that old. it's from the 20's or the 30's. i have the complete set of that edition. that is part of what got me by ian all these other books because when i found this set there were six or eight volumes missing. when i finally found out which ones were missing, i was on my way to becoming a full-fledged collector. so i finally collected all of those volumes for this particular set so it's complete. and in the meantime, i also collected several other complete sets like the one on the top which is basically the same books, they are just from a different publisher. then the ones in the middle with the yellow dust covers those are from the mark twain project in berkeley. they had been putting out scholarly editions for many years. and i have all of those. then on this wall over here are books about mark twain. also my 1601 collection this year. i'm not sure that it's appropriate for mixed company but there was a little racy story
. is great to hear and i'm originally from mississippi and grew up in this south where my parents graduated from school. i dropped out of school but eventually i went back and went to college and moved to ohio and got a job. even the church and some time that people buy your history in america and how we treat one another and even the slavery. i'm a big fan of frederick douglass also. in a piece that he wrote, he writes the real question that all commanding question here is whether american justice and american liberty and american civilization, the american christianity can be made to include and protect all the rights of all american children. as black people we feel not educated by history and other countries and you know as i talk to people from where i came from my struggles with my parents if you live in the south, even sometimes the black people seem like they have not comprehended what i'm talking about. the struggle and where we came from and where we are now. >> host: let's get a response from randall robinson. >> guest: well, i understand very much how you feel. i think that you
and his work has been cited by the supreme court. his writing is cited as an excerpt of the mississippi seizing supreme court and has had a direct impact. mark lomax is effective after the national technical association data previously worked in liberia west africa is a program manager for the united nations overseeing the liberian police and emergency response unit and a police response unit. he is also served as director for the bureau of education beauty retired from the pennsylvania state police for 27 is a service and a graduate of the fbi national academy. with that i will turn things over to radley. >> thank you and thanks for cato for putting this on and thanks for mark and the nt 08 for agreeing to have a conversation with us today. i'm just going to jump right in. so, right around thanksgiving in 2006 a narcotics task force in the atlanta police department was out on patrol i guess and they saw someone walking alongside the road that guy that they had previously arrested for various drug offenses. they jumped out on him through him to the ground pulled a gun on him and a week
as "operation plunder dome" and plead by an fbi agent named dennis who was originally from mississippi. and he lead the investigation that ultimately resulted in buddy's conviction. after a trial people said you'll never be able to convict buddy. in a city buddy went to prison with 67% of the voters thinking he did a good job even though they thought he was guilty. when he was sentenced, the judge talked about how he was two people. he was dr. jekyll and mr. hyde app and buddy said privately to a friend later, how come i didn't get two fing paycheck. what he was kicked of racketeering and conspiracy being kind of knowing about it but not actually being physically involved in the underlying act. and buddy kind of framed it as what did i do and i was convicted of being the mayor. some of the jurors i spoke to felt otherwise that he was a guy who knew how to keep himself insulated like a mob boss he once prosecuted, ironically. and that was able to stay out of the direct line, but that he knew everything that was going on. he was the kind of guy one juror told me who know how many rolls of toilet
mississippi. but when it was published in 61864 the country was at war with the south and then two years later appearing in to the title history of the plots and crime. >> to overthrow liberty people were still reeling from the assassination of abraham lincoln and that feels like a conspiracy movie in the '70s received respectful though this is a the your time san "chicago tribune" and the papers praised philadelphia philadelphia, harrisburg, and a pennsylvania even the democratic papered claimed it the most powerful book of the century. and then in them with the letters to warn him all and then one issa this since this started 2.0 he said you be careful of this food you eat and drink can what you take and it was also said to lincoln i have heard it was the undoubted fact that the last two weeks general's harrison and taylor came to their end of what was administered in their plates at the white house. after lincoln died two prominent ministers of detroit in connecticut it were the supposes murders of harrison and taylor and other alleged their assassination for the new york ledger but added s
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
themselves. >> host: on our line for independents. randy in west point, mississippi. >> caller: good morning! >> host: good morning. >> caller: if the ports in savannah, georgia going to be upgraded for the new tanker ships? thank you. >> guest: the the port of savannah is currently in the process of working in the corp. of engineer and the federal government to deepen the savannah river so it will be able to accommodate larger vessel the project is underway in term of that investment and improvement. similarly in gulf port, mississippi. as you know, that port was significantly impacted by katrina a few years ago. as part of the process of rebuilding and revitallyization of the mississippi coastline there's activity involved in terms of improvements and investment in and around the port or gulf port to both revitalize that community that have devastated by the hurricane, but also importantly to be able to handle the new type of vessel that will be transiting in to the gulf of mexico in a few short years. >> we have about fifteen minutes left with our guest. he's the president and chief execu
jersey, albany, new york, alexandria, virginia, and as far south as carolina and mississippi, and as far west as kentucky. more specialized knowledge association devoted to manufacturers, improvements in agriculture, the study of natural history. there was even a military philosophy society founded at west point. these all of your as well. these groups were invariably local or regional in scope and if you look at the names, they almost always have at least a town or city a solution within and often a province. it was very specific to the early precursor to the american philosophical society with a number of names that include something like the philosophical society of the society for advancement of useful knowledge or practical knowledge held in philadelphia in the province of pennsylvania. and from our perspective when you read this, it is sort of silly but it's important to understand in 18th century thinking, knowledge and its pursuit was a personal face-to-face experience. it had to be done locally. had to be done through face-to-face, through lectures. you have to have members need
nominated me and the campaign was congressman jim mcgovern from mississippi who had been -- he and joe mokely, the late joe had been strong supporters of our work. i knew him personalfully a sense. personally as a congressperson. whenever we were having trouble, they were always there. i have a great affection for him. >> host: back to '97 when the announcement came out. were you anticipating it? >> guest: we knew we were frontrunners. that's the truth. >> host: how did you know? >> guest: we knew we had been nominated. mcgovern wasn't the only one. there was a woman from sweden, i think at the time was the head of their foreign relations committee. she nominated us. i heard later that others had as well. when we were in norway negotiating the treaty which was in september of '97 was the last phase of the negotiation. journalists started coming up to us and saying how do you feel about being a frontrunner. our response is we're not here to discuss the peace prize. >> host: here is a picture there. where is that picture? >> guest: my house in vermont. we received the call. my now husban
of mississippi and represented to the lobbyist. so of course those companies contacted us and as jack abramoff did end haley barbour did and they wanted to see if their clients could get the foxcom contract or the lg see contact but i put up by the wayside. i was serious about the security of the capital. later when they kept getting complaints from members of congress not from haley barbour jack abramoff but members of congress to set i want to use myself. i called the nsa for national security agency and they came to my office and a private limit and i said tell me the living dead was involved in this. tell me what is the bottom line with this security aspect. they went ahead and they looked at this and we went to a room which was in the capital capital and that's a private room nothing bounces in and nothing bounces up and i won't reveal the information today. security in the capital but they said it's okay to do these if we do them this way. doesn't matter which company does them. the israeli-based company which in fact or the lgc american company it doesn't matter which one. if you do it
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
, where did that come from? before he came to nevada territory, he worked on the mississippi river, and he became a steam boat captain. and the term mark twain is two fathoms. okay, deep. they would plum the water and so for the draft of the steam boat they would say mark twain. well, he liked that, apparently, when he came here. this is the story that's generally accepted. there's another story about him having a tab at the bar, and if he had someone with him, he'd say mark twain, mark two, put it on my tab. i think they do that in virginia city for tourists. but i think the generally accepted point of view is from being a steam boat captain. so here he is, he's writing for the territorial enterprise, first time he puts mark twain, and it's published february 3rd of 1863. from then on he is mark twain. and his stock would grow as his stories would be picked up. it wouldn't be just in virginia city. a newspaper in aurora would pick it up, newspapers in sacramento would pick it up, newspapers in san francisco. mostly in the western united states through the use of the telegraph. and he's ve
parts of the mississippi belt. it is about flea increasing literacy rates basically eliminating gender disparity in educational aspects and one fact of the progress is almost completely unappreciated in the last is the way that access to higher education includes a status iranian women. especially that westerners would consider this unacceptable in their own societies and the majority of universities are now female. the majority of them are now female. and women's presence is now felt across many disciplines. notwithstanding, we had this with no direct connection on the ground and a cadre of so-called iran experts, many of whom are ex-patriots were iranian americans will flood the revolution in don't see the islamic public. they continue to misinterpret the iranian politics. telling us that the system is on the verge of collapse. we will continue to lose ground in the middle east. and a good example in 2009 we will have an office of wishful thinking on the green movement that emerged out of this campaign, it is solving america's strategic problem for the middle east. they did so even t
of emmett till and he is talking about the deaths of two other organizers in mississippi who would try to register to vote and have been killed and she is angry and she is sad and she is despairing because she came to that night having spent more than a decade organizing around cases like this and what was particularly sort of exciting about this case was there have been enough organizing and enough awareness that there had been a trial and yet still the two killers go free. and i wanted to start there because i think many people would have made the comparison between the lynching of emmett till and trayvon martin, but i think we can go deeper in that comparison and to think about that comparison not just as a comparison of sadness and of anger but of what follows. because i know all of you know what's going to happen four days later on december 1, 1955 and that is rosa parks who has spent two decades organizing. she begins her adult political life around around the scottsboro case in spent the past decade turning it into a more activist branch and so she comes to december 1, 1955 with
will in mississippi. >> caller: how you do. >> host: go ahead, sir. >> caller: nice to talk with y'all today in '97, '98, i was in middle school in mississippi, and dr. carson came to speak to the students at the school, and i want to know was he making national tour to come visit different states and different schools? because we also had to read his book and write reports in middle school. and i want to know, was he planning on making those types of trips against. >> host: what did you think of dr. carson's visit when you were in middle school? >> caller: this is the reason i'm calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his book was he had an anger management problem, and so in my town, one of the things that have -- with the young people that is on the rise, anger, a lot of. the rivalries, aa rise in murders, so he found a way to channel the energy into direct it elsewhere, and so i wanted to know -- and that stood out his book believe i wrote on that topic but it was in 1997 and 1998. so i wonder can bring that back and circulate throughout the united states. >> host: can you tell the t
not doing anything, probably not saying anything. >> host: next call from robert in mississippi. >> caller: how are you doing? nice talking with you today. in 1997-1998 i was in middle schools in mississippi and dr. carson came to speak to students at the school and i wanted to know, was he making a national tour to come to different states in different schools because we also had to read his book and right research ports in middle school and i wanted to know was the plan on making those? >> host: what did you make of dr. carson's visit? >> this is the reason i am calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his boat was he had a name for a management problem and in my calendar that is one of the things with young people on the rise. and rising murders and found a way to challenge energy in directing and elsewhere and i wanted to know, that stuck out to me and i wrote on the topic but it was 97-98 so i don't remember but i want to know could he bring that back to the united states and young people? >> host: tell the temper story as well. >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i have be
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
, they essentially were the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta where other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her, out of the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, who went to school just one day period in her entire life. i would argue it's one of the most eloquent spokesperson for the aims of the movement. the speech given at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you've not heard it, hear it. it is the most eloquent statement that i've heard, courageous woman. i mean, there's definitely her, but, again, i think if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about doing this history, being involved in this scholarly production of literature about the sighful rights movement is that we have a lot of good stuff coming out that is talking about the local activists who are anonymous for the most part, but without whom you would not have had a national movement, and if we go back to the point of where we are at today, clearly, it's a point where we have to b
you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, i'm very pleased to be able to join my colleagues in wishing dave schiappa well in his next adventure in life, and knowing it will be successful, and also build upon his knowledge and experience here in the u.s. senate. i know his contributions will continue, and it will be a pleasure to continue to follow him in whatever career or noncareer or on vacation, whatever he chooses to do, will be happy and rewarding as has his tenure here in the united states senate. no one is more respected, more appreciated than david schiappa. so it is a sad day in many ways to see him leave, but a happy one to know that he's going to begin a new era, and we will watch him closely and stay in touch with him and continue to appreciate him for throughout his career and life. the presiding officer: the senator from wyoming. mr. barrasso: mr. president, i'd just like to add to the comments. in wyoming, we have what's called the code of the west. and while david schiappa may be the m
gentleman from mississippi, mr. thompson, for a statement that he may have. >> thank you very much. thank you very much, mr. chairman. i think our witnesses for their expected testimony. in the four months since this small town of west texas was shaken, shockwaves have been felt across the country here in washington and even at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. a scale of death and destruction has come under focus and americans have been forced to ask themselves some very tough questions could this type of event happened here in my community? you facilities with explosives or lethal chemicals pose a risk to my family and my home or my community. the likely response is maybe. and surely the federal government does. this west facility explosion undermines that sense of conflict. the firefighters who have gone in to do what they have been trained. fight a fire. this was a chemical fire fueled by ammonium nitrate and until these explosions in the department of homeland security did not know that the west plant even existed. we administer the risk-based program that requires facilities with threshold
mississippi for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate your interest in my airports but what i want to do is make sure we keep it in the right language. my only -- sensitive personal. it is i do with time and attend a wedding like that in the private sector. it's sensitive security information. and that kind of information, we all agree, is something that is far more serious than someone not showing up for work. now, as important for me in this conversation is whether or not, mr. halinski, you saw the fact that in the contracting with tsa with private contractors, because you do not have the ability to deal with personnel found guilty of that. have you now change the contracting document to tsa to get you to where you need to be? >> yes, sir. we have changed the contract for all the contracts were spp airports, and there is a clause in there that requires them to report any type of misconduct activities of the workforce. and we also require in this new language that if an employee is identified with misconduct, that appropriate action needs to be taken by that company, sir stev
martin is the 14-year-old black belt that was assassinated in the middle of mississippi in 1985 for allegedly violating racial etiquette and speaking to a white woman. his body was placed in the tallahassee river with a 125 lb coffin jindal tied around his neck. it was shown in the jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our dhaka see. we think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from the jail. dr. king says the activism that has gone on the end of the young women and men in that are being addressed it sometimes as eight, naim, 10-years-old are taking the nation back to the democracy that was dug deep by the founding fathers. he was being too kind because the country was founded on racial slavery and it is a conversation that we still have not had. about 50 years ago with the march on washington provided a litmus test for democracy. when he speaks of the march on washington she says americans of all cultures and races have to struggle together and go to jail together to try to funda
: and you aren't very patient. caller you are on the line. >> caller: originally i have from mississippi and grew up in the south and i dropped out but eventually i went back in and went to college and moved to ohio and got a job. sometimes at church talk about history in america and how we treat one another eye of a big fan of frederick douglass also with the peace that he wrote the real question for the command in question whether american justice and american the ready, american civilization is the american in christianity can be made for ever all citizens. but not to be educated by history, as i talk to people about where i came from, my struggles, living in the south, talking to black people they see they do not comprehend what we talk about with the struggle in to where we came from. >> host: we will get a response from randall robinson. >> guest: i a understand very much how you feel. you can have often much reason or expectation of anything different. i have taken a the position particularly because in my view it is our do that doesn't mean we expect they will materialize in my l
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